Archive | March 2015

The Sun Also Rises (or, the Heterophroneo of Everything)

Today we’re going to talk about one of the biggest “bugs” in theology, which cascades down into conversation & contemplation bugs in soteriology, eschatology, metaphysics, and more.

This “bug” underpins much of what we’ve already talked about on this site over the past year or so.

First, let’s meet Apollos.

comic1Notice the shirt that Apollos is wearing. It points exclusively downward.

This is because Apollos is exclusively about reduction.

As soon as he found out that the blue rider and red horse were “both Play Doh,” he took a hammer to them and squished them into a hideous, formless mass.

His problem wasn’t that he looked deeper. And he wasn’t lying when he observed that both forms were, ultimately, “Play Doh.”

But he went too far in drawing a destructive, form-killing “should/ought” conclusion merely from observing shared pieces/parts or shared ultimate causes.

See the other guy in that last panel? That’s Amon.

The story’s not over. Let’s see what happened the next day.

comic2Notice Amon’s shirt. It points exclusively upward.

This is because Amon is exclusively concerned with maintaining forms.

Here, the problem wasn’t that Amon wanted to protect Blue-Monkey-on-Red-Elephant. Of course he wanted to protect it! It is interesting and meaningful and beautiful!

Rather, the problem was that — like Apollos — he erroneously thought that a destructive, form-killing “should/ought” conclusion proceeds from any observation about shared pieces/parts or shared ultimate causes.

This reasoning error prompted a loss-aversive overreaction against anyone making such an observation.

The inhumanly pallid faces of both Apollos and Amon represent the fact that both characters represent errors of reasoning (in specific, they are powered by the same is/ought non sequitur). These errors yield lifeless, bug-ridden theology, and Christianity has had a major problem with it for over 1800 years.

The Checkmark-Shaped Reaction

It’s true that as we practice reduction, a sort of “existential gravity” makes us feel as if we’re losing our forms.

This is because forms are where all meaning resides.

The situation looks a bit like this — for everything we care about:

formationreductionThis isn’t some wild theory. This comes straight from the Bible.

This is the teaching of the Teacher, concluded “upright and true” in Ecclesiastes. “At the end of the day,” all prospects can be reduced to that which is ultimately empty of meaning — “hollow.” (Read more about Ecclesiastes and meaning here.)

In other words, by default we live in a “macroscopic” world where forms are common-sense and plain-to-see. We have all sorts of folk conclusions about the simplicity of the world, like that meaning is purely objective (has no interest-dependencies), that responsibility is “buck-stops-here,” and that we have spontaneity and multiple realizable futures (encapsulated in a feeling of libertarian free will).

But as soon as someone busts out a “microscope” — literally or proverbially — these folk ideas begin to break down, and we start to feel “existential gravity” just like the Teacher of Ecclesiastes (probably Solomon) did:

journey1There are 3 reactions we can have.

The first is Apollos’s reaction: Radical reduction into a “tomb,” “dungeon,” or “fish’s belly” of nihilism, denying formative truth.

journey2The second is Amon’s reaction: Harefooted denial of reductive truth in fear of the “tomb,” “dungeon,” or “fish’s belly.”

journey3The third is Solomon’s reaction: Remember that formative truth remains true, even while reductive truth is also true, although some forms need to be dropped, modified, or refined, like a faceted gem cut from rough rock.

journey4This “check-marked shaped” journey ends in a declaration of compatibility: Formative truth is compatible with reductive truth, and their appearance of “disagreement” — their paradoxy — is because they proceed from different vantage points, i.e., “hetero-phroneo.”

(That, and the surface forms did contain a bit of false junk.)

Our quirky brains have trouble with heterophroneo; by default, they’re rather “monophroneo.”

And this yields the huge theology bug. It’s solvable, but only with hard work, and a refusal to be an Apollos or Amon (both of these characters are “Kochabs“).

Examples

“The dog and the dirty napkin” (we used this example before):

  • Dogs and dirty napkins are 100% different.
  • Actually, they’re 100% the same: They’re both mere collections of particles.
  • You’re both right depending on the vantage point. Yes, they’re both reducible to mere collections of particles, and we should avoid thinking that there’s some “magical” animating principle in dogs that makes them substantially distinct. But I don’t care much about that. I care about the fact that the former has feelings, thoughts, loyalty, and can play fetch, and is happy to greet me when I come home. The latter doesn’t have any of that stuff. And that’s where meaning lives.

“Altruism” (we also used this one before):

  • Altruism and selfishness are 100% different.
  • (“Psychological egoism”) Actually, they’re 100% the same. They’re both products of what eventually reduce to self-interests. For example, your desire to give to a certain charity reduces to something you care about. Even self-sacrifice is always in terms of what prospects you hope to achieve or principles you hope to exemplify.
  • You’re both right depending on the vantage point. Yes, they are both so-reducible. But our dictionary still functions. There’s still a difference in form between generosity and stinginess. There’s still a difference in form between sacrifice and retention. There’s still a difference in form between love-driven behavior and gratuitous self-service. Those are the things I care about. That’s where meaning lives.

“Ecclesiastes” (a deeper look here):

  • Objectives and objects are brimming with meaning.
  • Actually, everything is ultimately empty and meaningless. Laughter is great, but what does it accomplish? Wealth seems awesome, but it never satisfies. Ambition is an envy-fueled treadmill. The ground on which we build children, projects, labor, and learning is hollow.
  • (“Existentialism”) The search for ultimate meaning is futile — a chasing after the wind. This is an upright and true teaching. But it is also upright and true that laughter is great. Our journey should not yield nihilism, but a gem-like refinement toward what is really meaningful in life according to our interests, that is, food, drink, friends, family, finding satisfaction in our labor and projects, and fulfilling our “owes” to one another (social and moral obligations, including oaths to leaders and God) so that we avoid the “Collection Agent.” That’s where meaning lives. (Later, Christus Victor restores the shattered vessel, so that helps.)

“Freedom & Sovereignty” (many examples on this site; start here):

  • We act with free will; we make real choices and can be held accountable.
  • Actually, we are causal creatures and our thoughts & decisions are products of that which makes us “tick.” Rewinding far enough, we owe ourselves ultimately to external factors.
  • (“Compatibilism”) You’re both right depending on the vantage point. I’m a caused, causal creature, and I make real choices all the time. I have interests, emotions, thoughts, a will, and all of these are genuine. I make mistakes and have successes and triumphs, all of which are products of who I am, and who I am is always changing (God willing, I can even change myself in a recursive way!). As such, I can be held truly accountable for my real choices, but we definitely need to jettison folk notions of responsibility.

The Sun Also Rises

Ecclesiastes 1:5 says, “The sun rises and the sun sets, and hurries back to where it rises.”

But does it really do this?

The sun’s behavior used to be a big deal. The fact of sunsets/sunrises being mere perceptual phenomena from rotational motion — and the additional fact of the sun’s relative stagnancy compared to the Earth — so violated folk “surface forms” that many people became Amons and took up hammers.

When we take a microscope to the situation, we find that the sun isn’t actually traveling across the sky and “hurrying back.” The sun is millions of miles away, relatively still, while the Earth flies around it, rotating while it does so and illuminating a perpetually-changing hemisphere.

To some folks, this reduction destroys sunrises. And it does, sort of.

But look out the window!

See the fiery sky against the shadowy land?

See the clouds underlit with morning?

Look! The sky has been punctured with a knife of blinding light!

The sword of morning is slaying shadows right and left. The stone is rolling. The dungeon gate is opening. The fish’s maw is heaving.

Our reduction “destroyed” the sunrise.

And yet, the sun also rises.

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Holding ‘Folk Responsibility’ Responsible

(In this article, we’ll talk about the Fall in flatly literal language, even though I go with Origen’s perspective on the origins account, where some degree of folk symbolism obfuscates the underlying history.)

A while ago we talked about the Big Three Sovereignties: Three Christian approaches, broadly, to the soteriological and theodicean nitty-gritty of God and human freedom.

One of those broad approaches was the “Libertarian Free Will” approach. This is the wide path taken by most who believers in Christ: Numerous Evangelicals (both progressive and conservative), many Mainline Protestants (particularly Arminians), the vast majority of Orthodox and Catholics, and fans of things like Molinism and Open Theism / “Open Future.”

Libertarian free will lacks a coherent definition, but each attempt goes about positing a world — or nature of human choice — wherein causal backtracing is “cut off” at the point of human decision.

Remember that “power” of libertarian free will as we make a slight diversion.

Folk Responsibility

“Responsibility” is the identification of cofactors that contributed to something happening. This identification is in service of predicting, changing, encouraging, or fixing similar cofactors in the future.

This is what has made such a vital tool, for both individuals (regret, retrospect, self-teaching) and societies (punishment, reward), for both basic survival and for the rise of civilization.

Pretty boring.

But a weird thing happened, and continues to happen.

The process of ascribing responsibility became naturally simplified into something that mostly “did the job” of the above sense of responsibility, but was a bit easier to articulate and packed a bigger “punch.”

This was the idea of “causal buck-stops-here responsibility.” We can nickname this “folk responsibility,” as pretty much everybody slides into it “by default” and has to crawl and claw their way back out.

The “algorithm” works like this:

  • Select an event that satisfies (+) or fails to satisfy (-) interests.
  • Backtrace through the event’s causes. Stop backtracing when you arrive at any willful agents.
  • Populate an array with each found willful agent.
  • Divide responsibility — credit (+) or blame (-) as defined by your interests against that event-in-question — among those in the array.

That’s “folk responsibility,” and it’s the by-default view of responsibility, even such that it is popularly considered “what responsibility is.”

The above algorithm, of course, has a problem with a God exhaustively sovereign over a world that “runs on” cause-and-effect.

That’s because even the actions of willful agents are events with backtraceable causes. With God in the mix, he becomes the root cause of everything that happens (albeit most of it through indirection).

So, we have a problem:

eq1Uh oh.

What do we do?

See Romans 9:19. Our antagonist is saying, “Who then can be blamed? For who can resist his will?

Enter Libertarian Free Will

Remember the “power” of libertarian free will: “Causal backtracing is ‘cut off‘ at the point of human decision.”

It doesn’t matter that libertarian free will lacks a coherent definition; not even advocates therefor can agree on one.

All definition attempts are plays at coming up with something that has the “power” above.

That’s what it’s all about, like a centuries-old theological Hokey Pokey.

It is a maneuver designed to protect folk responsibility — to prevent it from becoming absurd under classical theism and a world of cause-and-effect — because folk responsibility is taken for granted as true.

The result:

eq2This unlocks all sorts of neat theodicean tricks.

  • Diseases? No problem; backtrace them to Adam’s decision in the Garden, then cut off.
  • Natural disasters? Hah! Backtrace them to Adam’s decision in the Garden, then cut off.
  • God creating those he foreknows will go to endless hell? Big deal. Backtrace their doom to their own decisions (their sins and obstinacy), then cut off. A man damns himself. God’s hands are clean.

Nice job, team. The Problems have been solved!

So, What’s the Problem?

Unfortunately, the problem with folk responsibility was always that it broke down under the load of various test cases.

Like a 16th-century schooner ferrying too many barrels of sugar.

Scripture’s pretty clear that Adam was deceived. Not only did Satan deceive Adam, but Satan deceived the whole world. Satan is responsible. And yet, Adam is still held responsible for his (and, by inheritance, our) expulsion from the Garden of Grace.

How does that work under folk responsibility?

It doesn’t. It violates the algorithm (and for good reason!).

We (that is, the majority of believers) choose to arbitrarily ignore the backtrace-stopping at Adam and keep going, while simultaneously adding Adam to the array of culpable agents.

Furthermore, we (again, the majority of believers) arbitrarily say God “catches” only the “leftovers”; when it comes to unsavory stuff, we never add him to the array unless everybody else is “disqualified” for culpability.

For example, Romans 8 tells us that creation was subject to frustration — disease, natural disasters, thorns, etc. — as a choice of he who cursed it, that is, God. While the curse was indeed a response to human folly, God chose to respond in the way he did.

But here, we do not add God to the array, nor do we stop the backtracing, even as God is ostensibly a “freely willing agent!” Instead, we let the responsibility trickle back to the Adam/Satan combo from earlier, which itself violated our algorithm.

You can make the Adam/Satan “share” or “hierarchical stack” for the Fall. And you can make the God-to-(Adam/Satan) “pass through” for the agonizing thorniness of the Curse. But you cannot do both and have a consistent view of responsibility.

We make these arbitrary exceptions because even as we assert folk responsibility, our reasoning tells us that responsibility doesn’t really work like that: We know that responsibility can be mitigated, transferred, shared, and stacked hierarchically, with potential for blame and credit to vary along that stack, depending on prospective intent (benevolence or malevolence), recklessness, negligence, and a host of other moral factors.

In other words, we’re almost all infected by cognitive dissonance on this issue.

  • We know folk responsibility isn’t really valid,
  • but that’s the definition of responsibility we assert,
  • and furthermore assert that it is valid.

The Disease’s Power

Unless laboriously rooted-out and recognized, cognitive dissonance is extraordinarily powerful in rhetoric.

That’s because it acts like a wildcard: An Ace when the round is called high-hand, a Deuce when the round is called low-hand.

And thus it is used — very convincingly to even very intelligent people — in an intricate, special-pleading dance to keep God’s hands 100% clean.

As logical dealers, we need to firmly say, “No wilds.”

(And the point of this post is that above “laborious rooting-out” and “recognition.”)

Folk responsibility should not be protected. It sucks.

The Other Avenue

Instead of the “Protected/Compromised” avenue from before, we ought to do the following:

eq3We then assign credit and blame (and even amoral ascription!) according to the moral teleology mentioned before, precluding the absurdum that “God suddenly becomes a sinner,” and adopt compatibilism, precluding the absurdum that “we suddenly become robots.” We rightly reject such conclusions as Kochab’s Errors, subsisting on an incomplete, only-partial rejection of folk responsibility.

Further, we appeal to a manifold interest set of God to:

  • Find meaningful the discrimination between primary and secondary causation. (More reading.)
  • Explain, at least in theory, why things are messy at all, i.e., why God would choose the thorny response. Which he did. On purpose! (More reading.)

Remember our antagonist from Romans 9:19? “Who then can be blamed? For who can resist his will?

Romans chs. 9 through 11 have a “national,” not an “individual” thesis.

But Paul’s response wasn’t, “You misunderstand! We individuals can resist his will.”

Rather, Paul’s response was a reiteration of God’s superordinate responsibility as a potter who makes vessels of both honorable (Gr. timen) and dishonorable (Gr. atimien) use; wine jugs and chamber pots (v. 21).

Indeed, Paul’s chapter 9 thesis is predicated on nations being like individuals, employed — sometimes despite themselves — for an ultimate chapter 11 ending.

But even though Paul did this, he proved his dynamic view of responsibility later on, in his second letter to Timothy (2 Tim. 2:20-22).

Here, he used the very same juxtaposition of honorable implements and dishonorable implements, wine jugs and chamber pots — and emphasized the subordinate responsibility “we vessels” have to determine our own timen/atimien status!

This doesn’t work under the definition of responsibility that sucks.

The Bible’s “heterophroneo handling” of responsibility is absolutely vital.

Bonus Material

The following chart gives an overview of the cyclic “free will debate” in the form of an adventure game. The Blue character is a compatibilist, arguing for the compatibility of human choice and responsibility with determinism, against the Green character.

Notice how the lynchpin moment happens at “responsibility for choices,” ending in a boring acceptance of compatibilism, a stubborn refusal to refine language, or a re-engagement in the cycle ad infinitum.

freewillcycle2

The following video features several thought experiments to help articulate why folk responsibility is bad, and how we, when we use our noodles, intuit responses according to dynamic responsibility instead.

Note that none of this is “Calvinism.” Many Calvinists are Christian determinists and compatibilists, but Christian determinism does not entail Calvinism, which has a number of eccentricities, especially in how it struggles with the prospect of endless hell.

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Invoking the Universe

Break Time

A while back, my wife and I attended a small family reunion, and observed the behavior of some little humans to which I am related.

Three of the children were involved in a drawn-out game of tag, and one of those being chased was clearly losing steam.

That’s when he had an ingenious idea.

“Okay, break time!” he cried out. And all three children stopped immediately.

After all, it was break time now.

Had he shouted, “I want to take a break!,” it probably wouldn’t have had the desired effect. The chaser might even have responded, “Tough luck!” and tagged him.

By wrapping his interests in objective language, it no longer felt a disputable and subjective matter; it’s almost as if the universe itself was invoked. Discussion isn’t needed or wanted. It’s just break time.

Rightful Writer

My wife teaches second grade, and has her students do a certain small group exercise in which each group member has a role, one of which is “writer.”

During one of these exercises, she recounts a certain little boy (we’ll pretend his name was Charlie) announcing, “I’m the writer, period, end of discussion.” His groupmates were subdued immediately.

My wife saw this happen, though, and asked, “Charlie, why do you get to be writer?”

“Because,” Charlie revealed, “I want it the most.”

At this point, a wave of realization swept over the children — it wasn’t “end of discussion” at all. They’d been tricked!

Everyone wants to be writer. You don’t get to be writer just because you want it.

But if my wife hadn’t intervened, they’d never have put that together. When he just is the writer, objectively, there’s nothing to discuss.

But when he just wants to be the writer, the matter’s in dispute.

Both “Break Time” and “Rightful Writer” proceeded from personal interests, and a desire to manipulate or subjugate group behavior. But both proclamations “invoked the universe” — cited objective states of the world — in order to obfuscate those interest contingencies, since personal interest contingencies weaken attempts at group manipulation and subjugation.

The “Rightful Writer” case was especially amusing to me, because I’m almost certain the child learned this technique from his parents.

Parents do universe-invocation all the time.

Silencing the Ice Scream

There are several good reasons to reject a child’s plea for pre-dinner ice cream. If the child pesters for a “good reason,” there are many to give.

One is that delayed ice cream is effective to compel dinner-finishing. It’s “bait,” in other words.

We can’t say that, though. “You can’t have any yet because I’m using it as bait” feels manipulative, and too arbitrary against such a “really-really-needs-ice-cream-now” emergency.

Another reason is that too much dessert is unhealthy, and inconsistent giving-in yields child-spoiling. But recognition of incentive gradients to ill consequences aren’t very convincing in the moment; “I know, I know,” the child says, “It’s just this once.

Another is that you just plain don’t want to bother.

“I’ll get it myself!” the child offers.

Nothing is working.

But what if you invoke the universe?

Dessert comes after dinner, not before.”

Now, this isn’t to say that a child won’t continue to protest. But this new reason doesn’t feel so dodgeable. You can “rest your case” here and repeat this invocation until the child is exhausted.

Indeed, every reason that made an interest appeal had the weakness of interest-circumvention. This new reason doesn’t have an interest appeal; as a result, there’s no circumventing it.

It’s just a “fact” about dessert and dinner. No subjective referents. No slipperiness.

Hot and Cold

There are all sorts of objective things about hot and cold.

  • Water boils at 100° C. That’s hot. Water freezes at 0° C. That’s cold!
  • When my wife and I get into our outside-parked car on a sunny day, we rush to turn on the air conditioning. It’s hot! We want it cooler.
  • During summer, it’s on-average hotter than during winter. In winter, it’s on-average colder than during summer.
  • Etc.

Pretty straightforward, right? Seems basically objective.

The other day, though, my wife and I had a dispute in the car. I thought the cabin temperature was hot, and flipped the dial to barely-blue. My wife thought the temperature was cold, and responded by cranking the dial slightly into the red zone.

This is our eternal struggle.

You see, we have different comfort zones. Whether it’s the temperature of water or the temperature of the car, there is a dispute within the blurriness between hot and cold.

That’s because “hot” and “cold” are experiential reactions to objective things. They’re ultimately interest-driven.

Did I arbitrate my comfort zone, and my wife hers? Of course not. If we could, we’d avoid all sorts of drama by syncing-up.

But they’re subjective things — proceeding from personal interests — nonetheless.

To what can my wife appeal to win the dial debate over what we “should” do? (It’s a zero-sum game in a car without dual-zone climate control.)

She could appeal to interest-consensus to invalidate my interests. “You always are too hot. Everyone else would think it’s cold right now.”

She could circumvent interest-appeals entirely by invoking the universe. “It is not cold right now. You’re just wrong.

But those don’t work on me anymore. I can spot them a mile away.

And so, she does the only thing left: She engages me in a physical battle over the dial, a War of Mutually-Assured Destruction (given that I’m trying to drive) that I quickly concede.

Meta-Ethics

As we’ve talked about many, many times on this blog (and will continue to talk about), right decisionmaking — the way in which we determine the answers to “shoulds” and “oughts” — works like this:

consequentialism

The square on the upper-right is purely objective.

But the circle on the upper-left proceeds subjectively. And this can cause problems when presented with zero-sum interest impasses.

So how do we solve those problems, in practice?

  • (Plan A) We can assert personal interests for sympathy or (Plan B) appeal to (hopefully) shared higher interests, but those often don’t work in genuine impasse.
  • (Plan C) We can then play at invalidating their interests by appealing to consensus interests. But why should a vegetarian bow to getting pepperoni pizza just because the rest of the group wants it?
  • (Plan D) We can then invoke the universe; “The thing that aligns with my interests, and against yours, is simply right, purely objectively.”

Notice what’s happening. A failure to subjugate through sympathy, shared consensus, and invalidation by external consensus naturally leads to the “pure objectivization” backup plan.

It’s technically erroneous (clearly, it is not “pure”; there are clearly interests spurring this thing).

It is meta-ethically incoherent.

It’s a language bug.

But it doesn’t matter. All that matters is that pure objectivization is the natural plan D and often works.

And, of course, a refusal at this juncture leads to a bland power struggle.

So “plan D” is the last “civilized” border town before the wild frontier, even while it’s corrupt.

Non-Objective Meaning and Morality

Meaning and morality are non-objective, which is to say, they are not purely objective.

Similarly, they are non-subjective, which is to say, they are not purely subjective.

Both the circle and the square are essential for coherent moral facts.

Ecclesiastes goes out of its way to explore this puzzle, and comes to the very same conclusion.

It’s a bullet we must bite.

But that doesn’t mean it ain’t handy to ignore this conclusion. Many smart folks have been doing so — by mistake or on purpose — for centuries.

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